Music World Prepares for Latin Grammys

Hear a preview of artists being featured in tonight's Latin Grammy Awards including Ricky Martin, Shakira and Juan Luis Guerra.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

Tonight is one of the most glamorous nights of the year in the Latin music world as the Latin Grammy Awards head to Las Vegas. But just in case you're not familiar with some of today's Latino stars, we thought we'd give you a quick preview.

(Soundbite of song, "La Llave de mi Corazon")

Mr. JUAN LUIS GUERRA (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: Dominican meringue star Juan Luis Guerra tops the list with five nominations. His latest album called "La Llave de mi Corazon," which means "The Key to My Heart" is a hot contender for both the album of the year and record of the year.

(Soundbite of song, "La Llave de mi Corazon")

Mr. JUAN LUIS GUERRA: (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: Ricky Martin, remember him? He's opening tonight's broadcast teaming up with the Blue Man Group. Martin has made a comeback this year with a tour and a new album. His single, "Tu Recuerdo" or "Your Memory" features La Mari, a hot new singer from the Spanish group, Chambao. It's also up for record of the year.

(Soundbite of song, "Tu Recuerdo")

Mr. RICKY MARTIN (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

Mr. MARTIN and LA MARI (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

LA MARI: (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: And let's not forget about the women.

(Soundbite of song, "Bello Embustero")

MARTIN: Our favorite Colombian hip-shaker Shakira is again a hot contender. Like Ricky Martin, Shakira has been successful in both the Spanish and English language market. Her duet with Beyonce, "Bello Embustero" or "Beautiful Liar" is another example of the crossover appeal. It's a nominee for record of the year.

(Soundbite of song, "Bello Embustero")

SHAKIRA (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

BEYONCE (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

SHAKIRA (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

BEYONCE (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

SHAKIRA (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

BEYONCE (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

SHAKIRA (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

BEYONCE (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: This year, the recording academy, which hands out both the Grammys and the Latin Grammys, expanded the list of categories to reflect the influence of younger fans who listen to all types of music in all languages.

The Latin Grammys have added alternative music to the awards list. A critical favorite here is a group from Colombia called Aterciopelados, which means the velvety ones. They've become popular among college crowds and their new album is called simply, "Oye" or "Listen." It mixes native Colombian instruments with modern beats. The group is also known for its social messages including this song called, "Oye Mujer," which challenges scantily-clad women to be more than just erotic fantasies for men.

(Soundbite of song, "Oye Mujer")

ATERCIOPELADOS (Band): (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: The Latin Grammys have also added a new urban music category. One woman getting a lot of notice is Mala Rodriguez for her album, "Malamarisimo," which roughly means "Lots of Mala." This is the third album for the Spanish hip-hop emcees, whose original music shows once again how hip-hop has become music of the world. Here's her hit single from "Malamarisimo," "Nanai."

(Soundbite of song, "Nanai")

Ms. MALA RODRIGUEZ (Singer): (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: You can check out the Latin Grammys tonight on Univision - I mean, Univision.

(Soundbite of song, "Nanai")

Ms. RODRIGUEZ: (Singing in Spanish)

MARTIN: And that's our program for today. I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's talk more tomorrow.

(Soundbite of song, "Nanai")

Ms. RODRIGUEZ: (Singing in Spanish)

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.