Lebanon Retains Christian-Muslim Power Sharing Christians fled Lebanon during years of war in the 1970s and 80s, so some Christians no longer deserve 50 percent of political power. That includes a presidency always held by a Maronite Christian. But most Lebanese, including Muslims, want power sharing to continue to preserve diversity.
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Lebanon Retains Christian-Muslim Power Sharing

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Lebanon Retains Christian-Muslim Power Sharing

Lebanon Retains Christian-Muslim Power Sharing

Lebanon Retains Christian-Muslim Power Sharing

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During Lebanon's 15-year civil war in the 1970s and '80s, and during last year's Israeli -Hezbollah conflict, waves of Lebanese fled the country. The hardest hit group was the Christians, and analysts say that as a result Christians no longer deserve 50 percent of political power. The most visible sign of Christian power is the presidency, always held by a member of Lebanon's unique Maronite Christian community.

As parliament struggles to meet a Nov. 24, deadline to select a new president, a large number of Lebanese — including Muslims — want the current Christian-Muslim power sharing arrangement to continue. Otherwise, they say, the diverse society of Lebanon may be lost.