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War Rugs Find Mixed Reception in New York

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War Rugs Find Mixed Reception in New York

War Rugs Find Mixed Reception in New York

Weaves Juxtapose Traditional Styles with Modern Tragedy

War Rugs Find Mixed Reception in New York

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1618397/1668257" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Detail of a rug, woven by an Afghan Turkman, that depicts the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Kevin Sudeith hide caption

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Kevin Sudeith

A few years ago, strange images began showing up in the traditional rugs woven by natives of Afghanistan. Instead of trees and birds, some rugs depicted tanks, missiles and fighter jets — familiar sights in the war-torn nation. These rugs have now developed a cult following, and New York artist Kevin Sudeith has set up a Web site to sell them. But in a city scarred by terrorism, NPR's Jim Zarroli reports that some of the rugs have proven controversial.