Trabants: Two-Cylinder Symbols of Cold War

A Trabant sits outside the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., Friday. i i

A Trabant sits outside the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., Friday. The museum sponsored a parade of Trabants to mark the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Christine Arrasmith, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Christine Arrasmith, NPR
A Trabant sits outside the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., Friday.

A Trabant sits outside the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., Friday. The museum sponsored a parade of Trabants to mark the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Christine Arrasmith, NPR

The peculiar little automobiles manufactured in East Germany were once the subject of derision. Now, 50 years after the Trabant's first production, collectors cherish these relics on wheels.

This week in Washington, DC, collectors celebrated the Trabant — known as people's car of East Germany — and the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

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