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Researchers Gauge Mental Health of Iraq Vets

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Researchers Gauge Mental Health of Iraq Vets

The Impact of War

Researchers Gauge Mental Health of Iraq Vets

Researchers Gauge Mental Health of Iraq Vets

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16266317/16266285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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For several years, doctors have been concerned that many of the troops returning from Iraq suffer mental-health problems but are not seeking help. When soldiers return from the war in Iraq, it often takes several months for mental health problems to show up.

A new study by the Army finds that those problems — which include post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and substance abuse, and depression — are more likley to be diagnosed after some time.

The study in the Journal of the American Medical Association also indicates that mental health issues are putting more stress on the military and Veterans Administration health care system.