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Letters: The Gender Card and 'Dexter'

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Letters: The Gender Card and 'Dexter'

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Letters: The Gender Card and 'Dexter'

Letters: The Gender Card and 'Dexter'

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Listeners weigh in on Hillary Clinton and whether she played the so-called "gender card," and Showtime's likable serial killer, Dexter — criminologist by day, and killer night.

ANTHONY BROOKS, host:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your e-mails and blog comments. We supersized the political junkie segment last Wednesday with the focus on Hillary Clinton and the question of whether or not she played the gender card after taking some lumps in a recent Democratic debate.

One listener argued on the blog that yes, she played the gender card and shouldn't have. She is entitled to the same treatment any frontrunner has endured, wrote Maury Simmons(ph). Should voters wait until a candidate is actually elected to discover a president who throws a fit when European Union leaders gang up on the president? If the frontrunner can't take the heat, get out of the kitchen - whether man, woman, something in between or both.

Hillary playing the gender card, let's flip it, wrote another listener, and consider maybe the male candidates are playing the gender card by making sure that the gender card is always front and center and not the issues. That from Susan(ph) also on the Blog of the Nation.

On the opinion page a week ago, Garry Wills argued that abortion is not a religious issue, that theology has nothing to say on the matter. Many of you disagreed. Nate Woodworth(ph) e-mailed from Missouri. Those of us with deep religious experiences and convictions know that our beliefs influence all our lives including many moral and social issues. Wills' argument that abortion does not appear in scripture is about as simplistic as those who argue that the Earth must have been created in a literal six days. Prove texting is sloppy no matter how you use it.

When we talk about TV, it's not usually so controversial, but several listeners didn't care for our interview with Michael C. Hall, the actor who plays the lovable serial killer on Showtime's "Dexter." Dick Howard(ph) e-mailed from Oklahoma to complain, the only TV I watch is PBS, and if there's a better reason in the program called "Dexter," I don't know what it is. I was appalled to learn that there is a TV series about a serial killer. What kind of person dreams up these programs? And, of course, this prompts the question, what kind of person watches a program about a serial killer?

Of course, "Dexter" also has his fans including Rachel(ph) who sent us this comment on the blog. The Dexter character is in every man. He has moral conflicts between his inner life and his public life and experiences many of the same social situations. That's what makes it addictive. We see ourselves in every choice Dexter makes to set aside his desires for the common good. For anyone else who's a fan of the show or the book it's based on, our member station at Fort Myers, Florida, WGCU has an interview with Jeff Lindsay who writes the "Dexter" series of books. It's on our Web site and you'll find a link to it at npr.org/talk.

And if you have comments, questions or corrections for us, the best way to reach us is by e-mail. Our address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from and give us some help on how to pronounce your name.

This is TALK OF THE NATION from NPR News. I'm Anthony Brooks.

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