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Remembering Life in a Comic-Book 'Factory'

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Remembering Life in a Comic-Book 'Factory'

Arts & Life

Remembering Life in a Comic-Book 'Factory'

Remembering Life in a Comic-Book 'Factory'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1627595/1628081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sid Couchey at his studio in Essex, N.Y. North Country Public Radio hide caption

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North Country Public Radio

Sid Couchey was a "factory artist" in the 1950s.

Like many others, he worked in relative obscurity, churning out drawings for comic books.

Though he didn't create the characters, Couchey's pencil work for Harvey Comics included scads of drawings that made Richie Rich and Little Lotta famous.

Couchey, now living in upstate New York, takes a look back at his career with Brian Mann of North Country Public Radio.