Tolerating the Museum of Tolerance

The Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles, which houses exhibits about the Holocaust, racism and human rights, would like to add space it could rent for weddings and bar mitzvahs. But neighbors have signed a petition asking the city to reject the museum's plans, citing worries about noise.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: The Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles is looking for a little. The museum, which is owned by the Simon Wiesenthal Center and houses exhibits about the Holocaust, racism and human rights, would like to expand. They want to build a two-story cultural center that could be rented for private events like weddings and bar mitzvahs, which would expand the museum's hours.

This week, the Associated Press reported that about 70 neighbors of the museum have signed a petition asking the city to reject the museum's plans for expansion. They apparently concerned that the sound of tolerance might go on until midnight. Sharon Lerman(ph), who lives nearby and belongs to the museum, told the AP: They don't care about us as neighbors.

Hey, everybody, can't they all just get along?

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.