NPR logo

Tolerating the Museum of Tolerance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16389607/16389630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tolerating the Museum of Tolerance

U.S.

Tolerating the Museum of Tolerance

Tolerating the Museum of Tolerance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16389607/16389630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles, which houses exhibits about the Holocaust, racism and human rights, would like to add space it could rent for weddings and bar mitzvahs. But neighbors have signed a petition asking the city to reject the museum's plans, citing worries about noise.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: The Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles is looking for a little. The museum, which is owned by the Simon Wiesenthal Center and houses exhibits about the Holocaust, racism and human rights, would like to expand. They want to build a two-story cultural center that could be rented for private events like weddings and bar mitzvahs, which would expand the museum's hours.

This week, the Associated Press reported that about 70 neighbors of the museum have signed a petition asking the city to reject the museum's plans for expansion. They apparently concerned that the sound of tolerance might go on until midnight. Sharon Lerman(ph), who lives nearby and belongs to the museum, told the AP: They don't care about us as neighbors.

Hey, everybody, can't they all just get along?

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.