Alzheimer's Disease Releases Couple to Love Again Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's husband, who has Alzheimer's disease, has fallen in love with another woman who also suffers from dementia. The news broke earlier this week. It's a story that is more common than you might think.
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Alzheimer's Disease Releases Couple to Love Again

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Alzheimer's Disease Releases Couple to Love Again

Alzheimer's Disease Releases Couple to Love Again

Alzheimer's Disease Releases Couple to Love Again

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  • Transcript

Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's husband, who has Alzheimer's disease, has fallen in love with another woman who also suffers from dementia. The news broke earlier this week. It's a story that is more common than you might think.

ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

We end tonight's show with an essay sent to us by Link Nicoll. She was moved to share this story after hearing the news this week that Sandra Day O'Connor's husband, who suffers from Alzheimer's, has begun a romance with another woman at his assisted living center.

M: I always wondered why my parents got together in the first place. Now, I could see it right in front of me.

SEABROOK: Link Nicoll is a photographer who lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SEABROOK: I'm Andrea Seabrook. Have a great evening.

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