Word of the Year: 'Locavore'

News worth an honorable mention.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

(Soundbite of music)

ALISON STEWART, host:

Jacob knows the way to my heart is to play The Roots on a Monday morning. Good morning, everybody. You're listening to THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. Sitting in with me today…

ROBERT SMITH, host:

…is Robert Smith.

STEWART: Yeah. Luke headed back West.

SMITH: To Seattle for Thanksgiving.

STEWART: Yeah.

SMITH: And I'm in - sitting in.

STEWART: Well, thank you very much. We'll see you tomorrow here…

SMITH: (Unintelligible).

STEWART: …as well, I do believe, if we don't scare you off.

Hey, Robert, join me on a tour to the outer reaches of the news universe.

SMITH: Oh, yes.

STEWART: It's a segment we like to call The Ramble.

(Soundbite of music)

STEWART: 2007 Word of the Year according to Oxford University Press is the word locavore. You know what it means? Well, let's break it down. We all did word diagramming as kids. It's someone who eats only locally grown food, that's the loca, and the eating part is the vore, or at least it's somebody who tries to. It probably means a lot of Swiss chard and kale(ph), if you belong to any of the co-ops out in Brooklyn.

The Chicago Tribune reports the origin of the word comes from four San Francisco women who abandoned South American cherries and other products made beyond 100-mile radius. There are some variants on the spelling, apparently there's a little bit of controversy. It could be localvore, that is also considered acceptable. Oxford - University Press not committing to put the word in next year or the year after, but for this year, locavore, word of the year.

SMITH: Word of the year. It also means for those of us in New York City, we won't go farther than a block to get lunch.

STEWART: Right.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SMITH: I'm a localvore. I don't know what's in the sandwich, but I won't go more than a block.

In New York City, another news item, a local news anchor has quit after being outed as a caller to a news talk show on his own station.

STEWART: Oh, I love this.

SMITH: Those of us who are journalists we felt this before. We've wanted to maybe call up at call in…

STEWART: So many times, yeah.

SMITH: …program. Maybe we've wanted to type a comment on the blog under someone else's name.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SMITH: Well, Gary Anthony Ramsay actually did it. He phoned in at New York 1, the station where he works. He got on air and he identified himself as Dalton.

STEWART: At least, it wasn't bababoon.

SMITH: Dalton.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SMITH: So the host of the call recognized the voice, called Ramsay after the program, and he admitted he was the real Dalton. Not long after this embarrassing incident, he quit his job. You know what he was weighing in on?

STEWART: What?

SMITH: Bernard Kerik.

STEWART: No. Like that's the tipping point for him. Like every other subject in the universe, he can hold back, but for Bernard Kerik, he's like I got it write, I got to call.

SMITH: He's a reporter. He gets to talk on the air all day, you know? What's he doing on a spare time?

STEWART: I'm calling the WAIT WAIT… DON'T TELL ME! next week.

RACHEL MARTIN, host: Okay. My turn, I guess.

I've got a story about "Top Chef." Kind of the underbelly of being on these reality shows, you get some unwanted attention. Apparently two women have been arrested for gay bashing a former contestant on the reality show "Top Chef." Josie Smith-Malave and her three friends were apparently yelled at and physically assaulted even outside this bar in Long Island over Labor Day weekend. And apparently, the cops now arrested two women charged in that attack. They've been charged with misdemeanor, assault and aggravated harassment. And they also apparently nabbed a homeless man who was nearby during the attack who's charged with stealing a video camera belonging to one of the victims.

It's not funny. I mean, it's…

STEWART: Are they really charmers?

MARTIN: Yeah.

STEWART: Charming ladies.

MARTIN: You know, it made me wonder, do these guys get a class on what fame -you know, what could happen to you when you're on these shows?

STEWART: You know what's interesting when back in, you know, the dinosaur age when I was working at MTV, there was in the second season of "The Real World," there was a kid who was on the show, got pulled up from a bar and really beaten up, and he refused to ever come back on MTV and do…

MARTIN: Yeah.

STEWART: …any of the follow-up stuff because he just dropped off of their radar because he said, you know what, I didn't sign up for this. I was just doing something kind of…

MARTIN: Yeah.

STEWART: …following a whim like college.

MARTIN: Yeah, repercussions of fame.

STEWART: I'm telling you fame without fortune.

SMITH: We have one last story about…

STEWART: Get it in.

SMITH: …both fame and fortune. Steve Jobs may be getting a raise which isn't hard…

STEWART: What?

SMITH: …because he gets paid by Apple Computers, which is (unintelligible) $1 a year. He's actually in the "Guinness Book of World Records" for the lowest paid CEO. One dollar a year, well, some papers filed with the Security and Exchange Commission, Apple says that they're basically thinking about adding additional compensation to him, I guess, $2, $3.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SMITH: That's like a 300 percent increase, right? Don't feel bad for Steve Jobs.

STEWART: I know.

SMITH: His estimated wealth is $5.7 billion. He's got Apple stock, and every year, he gets gifts from his employers, you know, like, oh, I don't know, iPhone, a Gulfstream jet.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SMITH: Yes.

STEWART: That's what I'm getting you for Christmas, Robert.

SMITH: If I got a Gulfstream jet, I don't need the raise.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Of tuitions(ph) and nanos.

SMITH: And that is what we call The Ramble. It's been fun.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.