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Low-Wage America: Health Care for the Elderly, Part II

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Low-Wage America: Health Care for the Elderly, Part II

Low-Wage America: Health Care for the Elderly, Part II

Minia Rivera, Home Health Care Worker

Low-Wage America: Health Care for the Elderly, Part II

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1642318/1642319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Minia Rivera and home care client Max Green. Rivera shops, cooks and cleans for Green, who suffers from Alzheimer's Disease. She works about 57 hours a week, seven days a week, for $9 an hour. Noah Adams, NPR hide caption

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Noah Adams, NPR

In the second of two reports from Arizona, NPR's Noah Adams spends a day with Minia Rivera, 54, who's been working as a caregiver since she was 14. One of her current clients is Max Green, an 82-year-old diabetic with a history of strokes, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

Rivera shops, cooks and cleans for Green, and helps with his shower — all for $9 an hour. She works 57 hours a week, seven days a week, and has no medical insurance.

Rivera admits she sometimes gets too close to her clients, but believes the work is important — because she says we're all going to need help someday.