NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16425740/16425732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
In Politics, Are Questions of Faith 'Fair Game'?

In Politics, Are Questions of Faith 'Fair Game'?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16425740/16425732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Join the Discussion

Should candidates answer personal questions about faith?

Jonathan Turley discusses his op-ed published in Monday's USA Today, in which he argues that if candidates are courting the votes of religious voters, then they should be willing to answer questions about faith. When pressed about "their own faith or faithlessness," Turley writes, candidates rarely give substantive responses.

Guest:

Jonathan Turley, Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law at George Washington University; member of USA Today's board of contributors.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.