Elections 2004: Feb. 3 Seven State Contests

Listen: NPR Special Coverage: Seven Presidential Races

Sen. John Edwards and his wife Elizabeth greet supporters in S.C. on Feb. 3, 2004.

Sen. John Edwards celebrates at a rally with his wife after claiming victory in his native South Carolina. Reuters Limited hide caption

itoggle caption Reuters Limited

Sen. John Kerry continued his dominance of the Democratic presidential race by decisively winning contests in Missouri, Arizona, New Mexico, Delaware and North Dakota, establishing himself as the candidate to beat in the contest for the Democratic nomination.

Kerry missed out on a seven-state sweep, with Sen. John Edwards claiming South Carolina and retired Gen. Wesley Clark narrowly taking Oklahoma.

Edwards' victory in his native South Carolina, which he had previously called a "must win," ensured his stay in the race. He continues to woo voters, particularly among rural areas of the country.

The Results

Arizona Primary
Delegate Count
(55 Total)
Kerry: 30 Delegates
(43 percent)
Clark: 22 Delegates
(27 percent)
Dean: 3 Delegates
(14 percent)

Delaware Primary
Delegate Count
(15 Total)
Kerry: 14 Delegates
(50 Percent)
Sharpton: 1 Delegate
(6 Percent)

Missouri Primary
Delegate Count
(74 Total)
Kerry: 48 Delegates
(51 Percent)
Edwards: 26 Delegates
(25 Percent)

New Mexico Democratic Caucuses
Delegate Count
(26 Total)
Kerry: 14 Delegates
(42 Percent)
Clark: 8 Delegates
(21 Percent)
Dean: 4 Delegates
(16 Percent)

North Dakota Caucuses
Delegate Count
(14 Total)
Kerry: 9 Delegates
(51 Percent)
Clark: 5 Delegates
(24 Percent)

Oklahoma Primary
Delegate Count
(40 Total)
Clark: 15 Delgates
(30 Percent)
Edwards: 13 Delegates
(30 Percent)
Kerry: 12 Delegates
(27 Percent)

South Carolina Primary
Delegate Count
(45 Total)
Edwards: 27 Delegates
(45 Percent)
Kerry: 17 Delegates
(30 Percent)
Sharpton: 1 Delegate
(10 Percent)

Sen. Joe Lieberman dropped out of the 2004 presidential race, acknowledging a poor showing in the seven state contests. With no win under his belt so far, Howard Dean looks ahead to the next round of contests.

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