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Cracks Start in Dollar's Dominance

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Cracks Start in Dollar's Dominance

Economy

Cracks Start in Dollar's Dominance

Cracks Start in Dollar's Dominance

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  • Transcript

In the past, a weak U.S. dollar has preceded an inflationary spike. Financial Times reporter Krishna Guha talks about why today's depressed dollar doesn't necessarily mean the economy will suffer a higher rate of inflation.

Guha also notes that most international trade is in the U.S. dollar. Guha said that now countries want to use a currency that is less likely to lose value. While a currency doesn't lose that status overnight, Guha said that means the dollar is starting to to see cracks in its dominance.

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