Calling All Homophones In this week's on-air puzzle, each definition or clue contains a missing word. That word is a homophone of the word that answers the clue. For example: If the clue is "have (blank) doubt" the missing word would be "no," completing the phrase "have no doubt." "No" and "know" are the homophones.
NPR logo

Calling All Homophones

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16784977/16816158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Calling All Homophones

Calling All Homophones

Calling All Homophones

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16784977/16816158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this week's on-air puzzle, each definition or clue contains a missing word. That word is a homophone of the word that answers the clue. For example: If the clue is "have (blank) doubt" the missing word would be "no," completing the phrase "have no doubt." "No" and "know" are the homophones.

Challenge from Last Week: From 12-year-old Lucas Barry of Newark, Delaware: Think of a familiar man's name in four letters. Change the first letter to the next letter in the alphabet, and you'll get another familiar man's name. What names are these?

Answer: Several possible answers include: Kyle/Lyle, Raul/Saul, Mick/Nick, Burt/Curt

Winner: Fred Ketteman of Seattle, Washington

This Week's Challenge: Take the word "stepparents." Rearrange these 11 letters to spell two words that are opposites. What are they?