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Small Bat Hides in Big City

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Small Bat Hides in Big City

Digital Life

Small Bat Hides in Big City

Small Bat Hides in Big City

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That black smudge is a bat. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

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Bill Chappell/NPR

Anyone know what species this is?

Bill Chappell/NPR

NPR's Bill Chappell sends this to the Bryant Park Project:

Since moving to Washington four years ago, I've walked past raccoons and biked past more than a dozen deer in Rock Creek Park.
So I was just beaming last month when I saw my new favorite urban animal: a furry little bat who lives downtown between Congress and the White House.
When I first saw him, he looked like the waste bolus an owl might cough up after digesting a rat: a little cylinder of fur, with random signs of bones and feet. The whole thing was nestled in a building's crevice, about three feet off the ground.

See the rest of the story on our blog, and tell us: What kind of bat is this, anyway?