Might Airlines Banish Frozen Sandwiches?

Airlines are re-evaluating their menus to make them more "flavorful" and "nutritious," according to a New York Times report. You can now get meals like chilled black olive spaghetti, and orange chicken salad with roasted pecans. Those meals are available for six to eight dollars, on some flights run by US Airways, Midwest and Delta.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And our last word in business today brings to mind the meal that I used to get on an airline that I will not name. Time and again, when flying back home to Indiana I'd be handed a turkey sandwich, still frozen. Maybe you remember this meal, maybe you got the same turkey sandwich, handed it back. If you were really hungry, you could gnaw around the edges, but the middle was hopeless. Or perhaps we should say timeless.

Anyway, the last word in business today is haute cuisine. Our friends at the New York Times report that airlines are re-evaluating their menus to make them more flavorful and nutritious. You can now get meals like chilled black olive spaghetti and orange chicken salad with roasted pecans.

Those meals are available if you pay $6-8 on some flights run by U.S. Airways, Midwest and Delta. Incidentally, one of those airlines is the one that used to serve the frozen turkey sandwich. Not that I'm bitter. Not a bit.

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