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Of Politicians. And Bats.

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Of Politicians. And Bats.

Digital Life

Of Politicians. And Bats.

Of Politicians. And Bats.

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17157996/17157956" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A scientist from Tennessee thinks he knows what kind of bat this is. Andrew Prince/NPR hide caption

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Andrew Prince/NPR

A scientist from Tennessee thinks he knows what kind of bat this is.

Andrew Prince/NPR

Biologist Hill Henry spots a wildlife drama outside his window.

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A tell-tale spot on one ear tells Hill Henry what kind of bat this is.

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Hill Henry says not to worry about this critter.

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Today on the Bryant Park blog, we take a look at an attempt to define presidential candidates' personality types. A new website called the PersonalityZone works off of observations of the pols in action. See who's an "Artisan" and who's a "Guardian" — supposedly, anyway.

And a friendly scientist from Tennessee checks in with an identification of NPR's pet bat. The little critter has curled itself into a crevice in a building, right in our nation's capital. Hill Henry runs its profile.