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Meredith Bragg: "My Absent Will"

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Meredith Bragg: 'My Absent Will'

Meredith Bragg: 'My Absent Will'

Meredith Bragg: "My Absent Will"

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17166131/17224231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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Meredith Bragg

Setting limitations can sometimes inspire creativity, pushing musicians to try new ideas. Meredith Bragg's latest album, Silver Sonya, features intimate, experimental folk constructed with two simple rules in mind: 1. Only acoustic guitar and Meredith's vocals were recorded. 2. There are no restrictions on how the recorded sounds could be manipulated.

With the album's stunning array of tones, it's hard to believe that guitar and vocals were the only things recorded. His songs are filled with minor key hooks. Warped and restructured acoustic guitar seems to mimic synths, horns, and even percussive sounds. Meredith's intimate vocals on "Ballad of an Opportunist" sing over light guitar picking reminiscent of Simon and Garfunkel-style folk. On the track "March," droning ambient noise produces a dark, cavernous feel.

Meredith has recorded several works with his band The Terminals. He was inspired to create this solo album after deciding to quit his job and take a long journey around the world. Learning to live with limited possessions and no set itinerary, he wanted to write in a way that forced him to explore music using different methods.