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Home from India, a Reporter Still Moves to Its Beat

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Home from India, a Reporter Still Moves to Its Beat

Home from India, a Reporter Still Moves to Its Beat

Home from India, a Reporter Still Moves to Its Beat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17190600/17196567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

While sitting in Mumbai's relentless traffic, Indians do what we do here in the U.S.: They listen to their favorite songs.

Most of the popular music in India comes from the soundtracks of movies. My driver loved a song called "Ganpat," from the Hindi film Shootout at Lokhandwala. I, too, quickly fell in love with this tune.

The movie is about a bunch of gangsters in Mumbai. The song is called "Ganpat" because that's the name of the bartender at the gangsters' local hangout. In this clip, the gangsters keep asking Ganpat for more booze — and, well ...

Be warned: Not every word in the song is one you'd sing in front of your kids. Or your boss.

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