'Stinky Diapers' for Bad Parents

Babytalk magazine is handing out its "Stinky Diaper Awards" for "parentally challenged newsmakers" and people who made "notable anti-mom moves" this year.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ALISON STEWART, host:

We're going to continue our bambino theme with this Best of the Best of 2007.

(Soundbite of song, "Simply The Best")

Ms. TINA TURNER (Singer; Songwriter; Actress): (Singing) You're simply the best, better than all the rest.

STEWART: Oh, yeah. We're going to run that joke right into the ground until the end of the year…

LUKE BURBANK, host:

Not possible.

STEWART: …with this list from Babytalk magazine. Now, sometimes those year-end best of lists are the best of the worst, as in people who made ignomy their thing in '07.

Today, we bring you the Stinky Diaper Awards from the folks at Babytalk magazine. It's a list of what the parenting magazine calls parentally challenged newsmakers and people who made notable anti-mom moves this year. I'll give you an example: On last year's list, Donald Trump, for publicly boasting that he refused to change his newborn child's diaper, or any of the diapers of his other five kids. It's not just naughty celebrities, though. Facebook made the list this year, and so has confirmed bachelor Bill Maher. So let's get to it.

Sally Tusa is a contributing editor at Babytalk magazine, joining us in studio. Hi, Sally.

Ms. SALLY TUSA (Contributing Editor, Babytalk Magazine): Hi, there.

STEWART: So before we get into the actual award winners of the Stinky Diapers -they don't actually get stinky diapers, (unintelligible).

Ms. TUSA: No, they don't.

STEWART: All right. How did…

Ms. TUSA: Unfortunately.

STEWART: …how did Babytalk magazine come up with the idea for this award in the first place?

Ms. TUSA: It's so much fun.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. TUSA: We just wanted to do something that had to do with celebrities and news. You know, we do a lot of stories on how to breastfeed your baby and how to get your baby go to sleep at night, and we really wanted to do something that was just fun and, you know, got a lot of attention. And this definitely gets a lot of attention.

STEWART: So how did you decide that someone was parentally challenged, or an anti-mom?

Ms. TUSA: The stuff is so - all these things that happened are so common sense. A lot of these celebrities who are just clueless parents, it's so shocking to us that the basic stuff, they don't know how to do. And you have to call it out. You have to say something about it.

STEWART: I just think it's interesting that there are actually things on this list, not just celebrities. There are some that are a little bit politically sensitive. Let's start with Facebook made your list…

Ms. TUSA: Yeah.

STEWART: …this year. What does Facebook do to moms?

Ms. TUSA: Facebook - there was a woman who had her page on Facebook, and she put some pictures on the page of her breastfeeding her baby. Facebook decided that this was obscene, and they not only pulled down the pictures, they shut down her account and said, you know, you can't do this on Facebook. Well, she's breastfeeding her child. There's nothing more natural in the world than that. She's not trying to be sexual about it. These are just really pretty pictures of her breastfeeding her baby. And we absolutely have to call something like that out. That's really uncool. And not only did we call it out, but people who are going on Facebook's made an issue of it and started a petition and got really upset, and so Facebook came around.

STEWART: Somebody else not down with the breastfeeding: Bill Maher made your list for something he said on his September 14th show. This is just a little bit of what he had to say about breastfeeding in public.

(Soundbite of TV show, "Real Time with Bill Maher")

Mr. BILL MAHER (Host, "Real Time with Bill Maher"): Next thing, women will be wanting to give birth in the waterfall at the mall.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. MAHER: Look, there's no principle at work here other than being too lazy to either plan ahead or cover up. It's not fighting for a right. It's fighting for the spotlight you surely will get when you go all Janet Jackson on everyone.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. MAHER: And get to drink in the oohs and ahhs from the other customers because you made a baby.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. MAHER: Something a dog can do.

STEWART: Oh, I don't think…

BURBANK: My mom…

STEWART: …I even need to ask a follow-up.

BURBANK: …my mom gave birth in a mall waterfall - my youngest brother.

(Soundbite of laughter)

BURBANK: It went (unintelligible).

STEWART: That why his nickname is Penney's?

BURBANK: Yes, exactly.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. TUSA: Bill Maher - confirmed bachelor? I mean, you know, even if he tried, I don't think there'd be any woman who'd be really interested in that. He's funny, ha-ha. He makes a good joke. But to say that women who breastfeed in public are poor planners, okay, so women who breastfeed - you have to breastfeed a baby every two hours, so they're supposed to be total shut-ins and they can't go out in public at all? They're - all they're doing is feeding their baby, Bill. Give them a break.

STEWART: Another on the list is c-section scheduling moms. Who are these women? What's their goal?

Ms. TUSA: This started with a celebrity trend, and there are celebs out there who don't want their bodies to look bad. Pregnancy stretches some parts of your body, and so they schedule c-sections a little bit early, you know, 37 weeks, which is not quite full term. And there are doctors that go along with this. And unfortunately, that trend has kind of trickled down to, you know, regular women who kind of say, oh, that's great. I don't have to wreck my body from having a baby. I can have an early c-section, and I'll recover so quickly.

BURBANK: But doesn't a baby keep cooking in the pan?

Ms. TUSA: Cooking in the pan?

BURBANK: I mean, you just pull out a little early and let it kind of…

Ms. TUSA: Yeah, not so much.

BURBANK: No, that's not (unintelligible).

(Soundbite of laughter)

BURBANK: I have a lot to learn about this.

Ms. TUSA: Not such a good idea.

BURBANK: Okay.

Ms. TUSA: Yeah.

STEWART: We're talking to Sally Tusa, contributing editor at Babytalk magazine, about their Stinky Diaper Awards for parentally challenged newsmakers and people who are notable - made notable anti-mom moves. Can you stick around? We'll get to the top two in just a moment.

Ms. TUSA: Absolutely.

STEWART: All right. So stay with us here at THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT. We have more of this story coming up, as well as…

BURBANK: Big Golden Globes announcement. And because we're on it at the BPP, we've got an interview already with one of the nominees. I think we're going to hear some of that. I hope we're going to hear some of that.

STEWART: That's coming up. Stay with us. Back in 60.

(Soundbite of music)

STEWART: Thanks for sticking us with - sticking with us here at THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT. I'm Alison Stewart. The face Luke Burbank just made.

BURBANK: I'm Luke Burbank.

STEWART: We're talking to Sally Tusa…

(Soundbite of laughter)

STEWART: …from Babytalk magazine about the Stinky Diaper Awards. Just want to finish up with you. You have the one special award called the Shut Your Blowhole Award.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. TUSA: Yes, we do.

STEWART: It went to Academy Award winner, Charlize Theron.

Ms. TUSA: I usually like Charlize, and I felt kind of bad about this, but she really - she said something very uncool. She said, I don't want to get pregnant because I don't want to look like a whale.

BURBANK: Ooh.

STEWART: Oh.

Ms. TUSA: I mean, ouch. Pregnant women looking like whales? That's not cool. Pregnant women are beautiful.

STEWART: And you also said it's a little hypocritical, considering…

Ms. TUSA: Yeah. She gained like 30 pounds to play that role in "Monster." So okay, it's cool to gain weight to win an Oscar, but not to have a baby?

BURBANK: And to play a serial killer?

(Soundbite of laughter)

STEWART: Right.

Ms. TUSA: Yeah.

STEWART: Good point. Now, number one on your list - no real surprise…

Mr. CHRIS CROCKER: Leave Britney alone, please.

STEWART: But you just couldn't, could you?

Ms. TUSA: We can't leave her alone.

STEWART: Britney Spears - the non-parent of the year.

Ms. TUSA: Ah, it's such a train wreck. It's so sad. And you know what? At the end of the day, we really feel sorry for her. And we said at the end of the story, we hope she gets some help. And please get this woman some help, because these poor kids are going to be suffering.

BURBANK: Yeah. I mean…

STEWART: That's a very good point.

BURBANK: …no one…

STEWART: You're very serious about it in your article.

Ms. TUSA: Yeah.

BURBANK: …no one is rooting more for Amy Winehouse to have a kid than Britney Spears.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. TUSA: Take Britney out of the running.

BURBANK: Please.

Ms. TUSA: We need somebody new. But she just - she can't buckle the car seats properly. She puts soda in their baby bottles. She stays up all night. I mean, it's just - she's not parenting. That's not what parenting is about.

STEWART: What parenting is about is what you'll find at Babytalk magazine.

BURBANK: Absolutely.

STEWART: That's a segue.

Hey, Sally Tusa, thanks for coming in.

Ms. TUSA: Thank you so much.

BURBANK: Coming up on THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT: Golden Globes information.

First, though, let's get some news with Korva Coleman.

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