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'Coyotes and Cowboys': Home on the Range

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'Coyotes and Cowboys': Home on the Range

'Coyotes and Cowboys': Home on the Range

'Coyotes and Cowboys': Home on the Range

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Listen to the song

'Coyotes and Cowboys'

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Greg Keeler, who wrote "Coyotes and Cowboys." Courtesy Greg Keeler hide caption

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Courtesy Greg Keeler

We've all heard the old saying that after a while, pets and their owners begin to resemble each other. But can something like this happen in the wild? Can an untamed animal and a human mimic each other? In this edition of What's in a Song, Weekend Edition Sunday's occasional series from the Western Folklife Center, we meet Greg Keeler, a man from Montana who's observed such behavior. He wrote a song about it, called "Coyotes and Cowboys."