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Joe Namath Gets His Degree

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Joe Namath Gets His Degree

Sports

Joe Namath Gets His Degree

Joe Namath Gets His Degree

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NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note that NFL great Joe Namath finally got his degree from the University of Alabama more than 40 years after he left.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

A couple of sports stories from this week's news. What do you do after you've won a Super Bowl, been in centerfold and modeled pantyhose? Well, this week, Joe Namath graduated from college, University of Alabama, which he left more than 40 years ago to play pro-football. Mr. Namath earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Alabama's external degree program.

And fans of Duke University's football team, which has won just 22 games in the last 13 years - well, they may have discovered an important factor of missing motivation. Ted Roof was just fired as the school's coach. In the latest job listing for head football coach in the university's human resources Web site, the school lists the coach's duties as counseling players, preparing budgets, assigning assistants, and representing Duke at various civic charity and alumni events. The job listing says nothing about actually winning football games. Winning is just for those ruffians over at University of North Carolina. Last night, Duke announced it will hire former Mississippi Coach David Cutcliffe to lead the football team.

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