Nashville's WSM Chronicled in 'Air Castle'

When radio ruled the airwaves, Nashville station WSM was a broadcasting powerhouse. Started in 1925, it became a cultural force that shaped the future of Nashville, largely because of its signature program, The Grand Ole Opry. The station's story unfolds in the new book Air Castle of the South: WSM and the Making of Music City. The book's author, Craig Havighurst, says WSM almost became a sports-talk station a few years ago, but the community and some music legends convinced management to keep the country format.

Havighurst speaks with John Ydstie

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Air Castle of the South

WSM and the Making of Music City

by Craig Havighurst

Hardcover, 279 pages | purchase

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Air Castle of the South
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WSM and the Making of Music City
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Craig Havighurst

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