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Clinton Crisscrosses Iowa to Reintroduce Herself

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Clinton Crisscrosses Iowa to Reintroduce Herself

Election 2008

Clinton Crisscrosses Iowa to Reintroduce Herself

Clinton Crisscrosses Iowa to Reintroduce Herself

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Rachel Booth is a waitress at Sally's diner in Forest City, Iowa. Out of all the presidential hopefuls, Booth says she likes Republican representative Rep. Ron Paul, but she doesn't think he can win — so she would lean toward Sen. Hillary Clinton. Nishant Dahiya, NPR hide caption

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Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Rachel Booth is a waitress at Sally's diner in Forest City, Iowa. Out of all the presidential hopefuls, Booth says she likes Republican representative Rep. Ron Paul, but she doesn't think he can win — so she would lean toward Sen. Hillary Clinton.

Nishant Dahiya, NPR

Harlan Rodberg, 63, employee of Winnebago Industries for 40 years. Nishant Dahiya , NPR hide caption

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Nishant Dahiya , NPR

Harlan Rodberg, 63, employee of Winnebago Industries for 40 years.

Nishant Dahiya , NPR

Sen. Hillary Clinton is crisscrossing Iowa in the next two weeks. Clinton has changed her strategy in Iowa of late, re-introducing herself to voters in an effort to address the "likability" factor that is often brought up as a weakness of her candidacy.

Many Iowans say Clinton has won them over, but they fear that she can't persuade Republicans to crossover and support her — and thus, can't win in the general election.

To find out how engaged Iowa voters are in the political process as the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses approach, NPR's David Greene recently went to Forest City, Iowa, near the Minnesota border. Forest City is home to a Winnebago factory and several lunch spots, such as Sally's Café.

The voters Greene spoke to said they considered the economy, as well as rising gas and heating prices, when evaluating which presidential candidates to back.

But, historically, only one in 10 Iowans will actually show up to caucus.

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