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Artist Chuck Close

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Artist Chuck Close

Artist Chuck Close

Artist Chuck Close

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1748083/1748084" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

He's been called the "reigning portraitist of the Information Age." He creates jumbo-size faces on canvas (8 or 9 feet high), copying them from photographs. They are painted in a dotted faux pointillist style. In 1989 Close suffered a stroke, which left him paralyzed from the neck down. Gaining partial use of his hand with a brace, he learned to paint all over again. There's currently a retrospective of his print work exhibited at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York titled Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration.

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