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Closing the Books on Boston's 'Big Dig'

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Closing the Books on Boston's 'Big Dig'

U.S.

Closing the Books on Boston's 'Big Dig'

Closing the Books on Boston's 'Big Dig'

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Boston's massive highway and infrastructure project, the much-delayed, much-criticized "Big Dig," will officially be finished as 2007 comes to a close. Over the years, the price tag for the project soared from $2.6 billion to $14.8 billion.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

At the end of this year, one of the nation's most complex and costly highway projects comes to an end.

We're talking about the network of underground highways and bridges and ramps through Boston known as the Big Dig. On December 31st, the joint venture between the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and the private Megaproject contractor officially expires and it leaves a complicated legacy.

The Big Dig is considered a triumph of engineering and allowed the city to reclaim its waterfront, drastically cut commute times, but the price tag soared from $2.6 billion to more than $14 billion. And Boston commuters had to endure traffic jams and tunnel leaks and a ceiling collapse that killed a motorist.

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