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Too Fat? Not My Kid

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Too Fat? Not My Kid

Research News

Too Fat? Not My Kid

Too Fat? Not My Kid

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Childhood obesity is a much-publicized problem, but it may be that many parents fail to recognize the signs. Researchers surveyed parents of children ages 6 to 11 who were classified as so overweight they were at risk for health problems. Only 13 percent of the parents thought their youngsters were very overweight, and almost half said they were "about the right weight."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Funny if kids may be overweight but not in the eyes of their parents. Researchers surveyed parents of children ages 6 to 11. Kids are classified as an obese or extremely overweight and running the risk of health problems. Only 13 percent of parents thought their kids were very overweight. Close to half the parents said their overweight kids are about the right weight. Some even thought their offspring are a little light.

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