Egypt Seeks to Copyright Pyramids

The Great Sphinx of Giza i i

The Great Sphinx of Giza, a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue, sits on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile River. Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images
The Great Sphinx of Giza

The Great Sphinx of Giza, a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue, sits on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile River.

Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images

If you're planning to build an exact replica of the Great Pyramid in your backyard, you might want to hold off.

Egypt is considering a bill that would copyright its antiquities, from the pyramids to scarab beetles, in an attempt to get paid from the sale of replicas. Under the law, anyone seeking to make an exact replica of a copyrighted Pharaonic artifact would have to seek permission and pay a fee.

The bill arose after an Egyptian newspaper reported that more people visit the pyramid-shaped Luxor Hotel in Las Vegas than the real pyramids in Luxor. The government figured the hotel should share the profits.

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