Woody Allen on Aging, Filmmaking and Escape

Woody Allen

At 72, Woody Allen says he has learned to ignore the "peripheral nonsense" of the movie industry. "Just shut up and make your movies and that really works fine," he says. Malcolm Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Malcolm Taylor/Getty Images
Tom Wilkinson, Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell star in 'Cassandra's Dream.' i i

Tom Wilkinson, Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell star in Allen's latest work, Cassandra's Dream. Keith Hamshere/TWC 2007 hide caption

itoggle caption Keith Hamshere/TWC 2007
Tom Wilkinson, Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell star in 'Cassandra's Dream.'

Tom Wilkinson, Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell star in Allen's latest work, Cassandra's Dream.

Keith Hamshere/TWC 2007

Though he is considered the quintessential New Yorker, filmmaker Woody Allen has made his last three films in Europe. His latest project, Cassandra's Dream, is set in London and tells the story of two brothers who resort to desperate measures when faced with financial woes.

Scott Simon talked with Allen, now 72, about his current project, his past work, and his trademark mixture of comedy and neurosis. His 2006 film, Match Point, earned some of the strongest reviews he's gotten in recent years. The new film, Cassandra's Dream, stars Colin Farrell, Ewan McGregor, Tom Wilkinson and Hayley Atwell.

"They're not wildly deluded," Allen says of the ambitious brothers in the film. "Of course, as with most people, most of our dreams don't really work out."

Yet Allen says that he has been surprisingly lucky in this regard — most of his dreams have been fulfilled: from being a comedian, to working as a film director, to playing New Orleans jazz all over the world with his band despite his self-described "utter mediocrity."

Through it all, Allen remains drawn to filmmaking.

"When I was a child, films were a great escape," he says. "When I grew up, I found that I could escape on the other side of the camera ... I'm able to fabricate the dreams myself and then participate in them."

Allen says he hasn't learned very much during his lifetime in show business, but he has learned how to ignore the "peripheral nonsense" of the movie industry and keep his "nose to the grindstone."

"Don't read your reviews," he says. "Don't believe them when they tell you you're great; don't worry if they tell you you're no good ... Just shut up and make your movies and that really works fine."

'Cassandra's Dream'

Ewan McGregor, Colin Farrell with beers on a balcony i i

Bloody brothers: Ewan McGregor (left) and Colin Farrell play good kids gone bad in Cassandra's Dream. Keith Hamshere/The Weinstein Company hide caption

itoggle caption Keith Hamshere/The Weinstein Company
Ewan McGregor, Colin Farrell with beers on a balcony

Bloody brothers: Ewan McGregor (left) and Colin Farrell play good kids gone bad in Cassandra's Dream.

Keith Hamshere/The Weinstein Company
  • Director: Woody Allen
  • Genre: Crime Drama
  • Running Time: 108 minutes

Woody Allen's unofficial London murder trilogy (it began with the thriller Match Point and continued with the detective story Scoop) concludes with an (a)morality tale of sorts.

A pair of brothers — go-getting social climber Ewan McGregor and go-along alcoholic Colin Farrell — agree to kill a man their rich uncle needs rubbed out. Why the uncle would entrust the job to two ineffectual kids with no apparent aptitude for skulduggery isn't clear. But he does, and there follows a tale of nerves, self-doubt, guilt and comeuppance. The story's decently compelling, the acting stylized (wait 'til you hear Farrell's on-again-off-again Cockney accent) if never terribly believable.

It's never hard to sit through, even if Allen (who wrote and directed, but does not appear), ends the tale too abruptly. The final frames come so soon after the dramatic climax, in fact, that you might think he simply lost the last five pages of the script.

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