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Lawrence Lessig: 'Free Culture'

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Lawrence Lessig: 'Free Culture'

Lawrence Lessig: 'Free Culture'

Lessig's New Book Condemns the Monopoly of Ideas

Lawrence Lessig: 'Free Culture'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1785931/1785981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In Lawrence Lessig's Free Culture, the Stanford law professor argues that intellectual property laws are hurting creativity. hide caption

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In Lawrence Lessig's Free Culture, the author and Stanford law professor argues that large corporations are using technology and the law to put a stranglehold on new ideas. He argues that the Internet age calls for a new way of deciding who can own an idea. "Thomas Jefferson considered protecting the public against overly long monopolies on creative works an essential government role," Lessig writes. "What did he know that we’ve forgotten?"

Guests:

Lawrence Lessig, author of Free Culture and professor of law at Stanford University

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