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Physics of Baseball

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Physics of Baseball

Physics of Baseball

Physics of Baseball

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1786492/1786493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Mont Hubbard, a physicist at the University of California at Davis. He and some colleagues have published a paper in which they modeled the flight of a pitched baseball and a bat's swing and identified the the factors which optimize the distance of the ball's flight after being hit. Among other things they discovered was that — counter-intuitively — hitting a curve ball at the optimum instant will drive the ball farther than hitting a fastball at the optimum instant.

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