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Father of 'Green Revolution' Derides Organic Movement

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Father of 'Green Revolution' Derides Organic Movement

Father of 'Green Revolution' Derides Organic Movement

Father of 'Green Revolution' Derides Organic Movement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1794021/1794022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with biologist Norman Borlaug, who turned 90 years old this week, about the "Green Revolution" in agriculture his research helped to spark. Borlaug promoted inorganic fertilizers to create higher yields crops — and for his efforts at curbing world hunger, he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970. But today, many environmentalists are challenging the "Green Revolution" and urge a shift back to organic fertilizers. Borlaug says the theories of who he calls "extreme greenies" would be inadequate to feed the world.

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