NPR logo

'Rolling' Shot with Wheelchair-Mounted Cameras

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17993638/17993628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'Rolling' Shot with Wheelchair-Mounted Cameras

Science

'Rolling' Shot with Wheelchair-Mounted Cameras

'Rolling' Shot with Wheelchair-Mounted Cameras

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17993638/17993628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Galen Buckwalter, a clinical psychologist paralyzed when he was 17, mounted a camera to his wheelchair to capture footage for Rolling. Buckwalter and the other participants provided 212 hours of tape to physician and filmmaker Gretchen Berland. Courtesy of Gretchen Berland hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Gretchen Berland

Galen Buckwalter, a clinical psychologist paralyzed when he was 17, mounted a camera to his wheelchair to capture footage for Rolling. Buckwalter and the other participants provided 212 hours of tape to physician and filmmaker Gretchen Berland.

Courtesy of Gretchen Berland

Watch Clips

'A world most of us do not see'

'A beautiful Saturday night'

'Baby shower'

Physician and filmmaker Gretchen Berland gave video cameras to three Los Angeles residents in wheelchairs and asked them to document their everyday lives. The result is Rolling, a frank and witty documentary that sheds light on the daily challenges of living with limited mobility.

Galen Buckwalter, a clinical psychologist paralyzed when he was 17, is one of the participants in the film. He mounted a camera to his wheelchair and chronicled his life — from doctor's visits to family camping trips. Buckwalter identifies himself as a "proud gimp," and voices his frustration that, not only is he defined as disabled, but he is also expected to "feel and act disabled."

Though the film began as Berland's attempt to document the experience of being in a wheelchair, she says, "In the end, it's really about life. It's not about feeling sorry for someone with a disability."