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Stolen Boomerang Returned

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Stolen Boomerang Returned

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Stolen Boomerang Returned

Stolen Boomerang Returned

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Twenty five years later, a boomerang has come back. Those flying blades are used by Australia's aborigines to hunt animals. They're supposed to return to a skilled thrower. And back in 1983, one disappeared from a museum in Australia's northern state of Queensland. Now an American has returned it. The man identified only as Peter included a check. He also sent a note saying he stole the artifact when he was "younger and dumber."

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