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Voices in the News
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News
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A montage of some of the voices in the Nevada caucuses and the Republican primary in South Carolina, including Sen. (D-NY); Former Gov. Mitt Romney (R-MA) and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

Big wins yesterday for presidential candidates John McCain in South Carolina and Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton in Nevada. In a moment, what's next for the candidates? First, here's how they reacted last night.

Senator HILLARY CLINTON (Democrat, New York; Democratic Presidential Candidate): We're going to be picking a president on February 5th and we have to pick someone that can be ready to lead on day one, as soon as you walk into that Oval Office and see that stack of problems that is waiting.

Mr. MITT ROMNEY (Former Republican Governor, Massachusetts; Republican Presidential Candidate): This is just a wonderful feeling. This has been an extraordinary day for me. We have an event that's already concluded in Nevada, a caucus there. It's a big presidential sweepstakes state, as you know, and we won that one handily today. I'm really pleased.

Senator JOHN McCAIN (Republican, Arizona; Republican Presidential Candidate): My friends, as pleased as we are about the results - and we have a reason to celebrate tonight - I know that I must keep foremost in my mind that I am not running for president to be somebody, but to do something.

(Soundbite of cheering)

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