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After the 'Surge': What Has Changed in Iraq?

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After the 'Surge': What Has Changed in Iraq?

Iraq

After the 'Surge': What Has Changed in Iraq?

After the 'Surge': What Has Changed in Iraq?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18343065/18343049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Feb. 2007, President Bush called for an additional 30,000 U.S. troops to be sent to Iraq. A year later, violence has decreased, but critics charge that the so-called troop "surge" had little to do with it. Experts discuss violence in Iraq and how life has changed for Iraqi civilians.

Guests:

David Morris, author of the article "Trophy Town: Ramadi Revisited, October 2007" published in the Virginia Quarterly Review

Stephen Farrell, Baghdad correspondent for The New York Times

Sen. Jack Reed, (D-RI) recently returned from his 11th trip to Iraq

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