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Animal Learning Study Sees Gender Difference

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Animal Learning Study Sees Gender Difference

Science

Animal Learning Study Sees Gender Difference

Animal Learning Study Sees Gender Difference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1837728/1837729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Young female chimps learn how to use sticks to fish for termites faster than their male peers, according to a report in the journal Nature. Researcher Elizabeth Lonsdorf studied a test group of wild chimpanzees from the Gombe National Park in Tanzania. Similar sex-based differences have been seen in human children learning new skills. Hear NPR's Christopher Joyce and Lonsdorf.

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