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Jazz Ahead: The Future of a Genre

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Jazz Ahead: The Future of a Genre

Music

Jazz Ahead: The Future of a Genre

Singer, Contemporaries Shine at Kennedy Center Workshop

Jazz Ahead: The Future of a Genre

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1841147/1841543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Singer Mari Anne Jayme hide caption

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Singer Mari Anne Jayme is among a group of promising young musicians invited to Betty Carter's Jazz Ahead program at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Started by the late jazz singer in 1993, the annual week-long event offers workshops and coaching for emerging artists. NPR's Cheryl Corley talks with Jayme, trumpeter Marlon Winder and program residency director Nathan Davis.

One of the songs played at the 2004 Jazz Ahead concert performances — and available in full at left — was Jayme's "Random," which she composed and sings with an assist from Winder on trumpet.

Winder's "Back Again," an orginial composition from the Howard University computer engineering major, features his own trumpet work.

And "Like Woody," a Woody Shaw-inspired piece from Matt White, has White on trumpet and vocals by Kathleen Grace.

Video of the performances by all of the 2004 Jazz Ahead participants is available on the Kennedy Center Web page linked below.

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