U.S. Soldiers Fight Insurgents in New Parts of Iraq

A few young men showed up to join a Concerned Local Citizens group in the village of Bechigan. i i

hide captionA few young men showed up to join a Concerned Local Citizens group in the village of Bechigan. U.S. commanders were hoping for 50, but many potential recruits are not yet convinced that the Americans will be there to back them up if al-Qaida in Iraq returns.

Corey Flintoff, NPR
A few young men showed up to join a Concerned Local Citizens group in the village of Bechigan.

A few young men showed up to join a Concerned Local Citizens group in the village of Bechigan. U.S. commanders were hoping for 50, but many potential recruits are not yet convinced that the Americans will be there to back them up if al-Qaida in Iraq returns.

Corey Flintoff, NPR

The U.S. military surge in Iraq has brought American soldiers to parts of the country where they haven't operated much in the past — areas that had become sanctuaries for insurgent groups.

In one village north of Baghdad, an Army cavalry squadron is working to convince local people to fight al-Qaida in Iraq and set up a Concerned Local Citizens group — the Army's name for the local self-defense forces that it pays to resist insurgents.

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