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Researchers Create One-Parent Mouse

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Researchers Create One-Parent Mouse

Science

Researchers Create One-Parent Mouse

Researchers Create One-Parent Mouse

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1846255/1846256" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Scientists in Japan prove that it is possible to get a live, fertile mouse by activating an egg containing only DNA from female mice. The process of getting an unfertilized egg to start dividing is called parthenogenesis. Although many non-mammalian species reproduce this way, the Japanese mouse is the first known incidence in mammals. NPR's Joe Palca reports.