Siegel to 'Electronic Mob': TTYL

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The Internet has fundamentally changed the nature of human interaction, says critic Lee Siegel. In his latest book, Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob, Siegel argues for a more evolved online universe.

This week, Siegel will be taking a look each day at the Bryant Park Project blog and Twitter feed. Siegel is a senior editor at the New Republic. In its review of his new book, the New York Times calls him a "swaggeringly abrasive cultural critic.

On our blog: In his first day at our electronic mob, Siegel cautions us against mere "talkativeness" and calls a post about a cupcake "an island refuge."

At least he likes our baked goods.

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Against the Machine

Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob

by Lee Siegel

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