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Photos of Caskets Bearing U.S. Soldiers Hit the Web

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Photos of Caskets Bearing U.S. Soldiers Hit the Web

Photos of Caskets Bearing U.S. Soldiers Hit the Web

Photos of Caskets Bearing U.S. Soldiers Hit the Web

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1848793/1848794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In this undated photo recently released by the U.S. Air Force, caskets bearing U.S. soldiers are unloaded after a flight from the Middle East to Dover Air Force Base in Dover, Del. TheMemoryHole.com, U.S. Air Force, Reuters and CORBIS hide caption

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toggle caption TheMemoryHole.com, U.S. Air Force, Reuters and CORBIS

NPR's Madeleine Brand examines the controversy over photographs of military caskets returning from Iraq.

Photographer Tami Silicio, working for an airline contractor in Kuwait, lost her job for giving a photo of caskets containing the remains of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq to The Seattle Times newspaper.

Now her original photos and hundreds more, released by the U.S. Air Force, are featured on a Web site called TheMemoryHole.org.

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