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Texas' Little-Known 'Forbidden City'

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Texas' Little-Known 'Forbidden City'

Texas' Little-Known 'Forbidden City'

Houston Suburb Houses Replica of Chinese Emperor's Burial Tomb

Texas' Little-Known 'Forbidden City'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1849178/1849360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tourists stand outside a replica of Emperor Qin Shi Huangdi's tomb at the Forbidden Gardens in Katy, Texas. Rows of thousands of terra cotta soldiers line the pit. © Greg Smith/CORBIS SABA hide caption

Close-Up of the Terra Cotta Soldiers
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© Greg Smith/CORBIS SABA

The Houston suburb of Katy, Texas, is home to an exotic but little-known attraction: the country's only replica of China's Forbidden City. Known as the Forbidden Gardens, the attraction opened in 1996. It features a huge burial pit — the size of several football fields and lined with rows of clay soldiers — that represents the tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huangdi, who ruled the Forbidden City during the 3rd century B.C. Sarah Richards reports.