U.S. 'No Photo' Policy and the Caskets of U.S. Soldiers Americans woke up today to something that's been hidden from view during the war in Iraq -- flag-draped caskets of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq. A policy dating back to the first Bush administration bans media coverage of caskets arriving at military bases. The photographs were released to First Amendment activist Russ Kick, who had filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to get the images. NPR's Melissa Block examines the "no photo" policy, and what it means for a country at war to witness the return of their dead.
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U.S. 'No Photo' Policy and the Caskets of U.S. Soldiers

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U.S. 'No Photo' Policy and the Caskets of U.S. Soldiers

U.S. 'No Photo' Policy and the Caskets of U.S. Soldiers

U.S. 'No Photo' Policy and the Caskets of U.S. Soldiers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1849313/1849314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Americans woke up today to something that's been hidden from view during the war in Iraq — flag-draped caskets of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq. A policy dating back to the first Bush administration bans media coverage of caskets arriving at military bases. The photographs were released to First Amendment activist Russ Kick, who had filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to get the images. NPR's Melissa Block examines the "no photo" policy, and what it means for a country at war to witness the return of their dead.

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