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Giants' Punter Feagles Finally Living the Dream

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Giants' Punter Feagles Finally Living the Dream

Sports

Giants' Punter Feagles Finally Living the Dream

Giants' Punter Feagles Finally Living the Dream

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It sounds like something out of a fairy tale. A grizzled football veteran sets the all-time record for most consecutive games played, announces his retirement, but soon changes his mind and comes back. Then in his 20th season, he makes it to the Super Bowl for the first time in his long career. On top of that, the game is being played in his home town of Phoenix. The only catch is, if Disney made this into a movie, the guy would probably be the star quarterback. In this case, he's the punter, 41-year-old New York Giant Jeff Feagles.

He might not be grabbing all the headlines, but he's actually one of the best ever to play the position. In addition to holding the NFL record for most consecutive games played he holds the all time records for most punts and most punts placed inside the 20 yard line. Feagles spoke to the Bryant Park Project ahead of his first trip to the Super Bowl about his decision to come back for another season, a punter's competitive fire, and the outdoor kitchen he got from a teammate in exchange for his jersey number. He says Giants coach Tom Coughlin, who has a reputation for being coldhearted, helped him make the decision to keep playing, and is actually "a very caring individual and a great person . . . a crazy coach, too." And Feagles says the key to his longevity is his mantra, "You either get better or you get worse."

However, he didn't seem to take the BPP's request for Super Bowl tickets very seriously.

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