Knitting Guerrillas Rock the Yarn Extreme knitters cover rooms and create graffiti with their updated take on a traditional craft.
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Knitting Guerrillas Rock the Yarn

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Knitting Guerrillas Rock the Yarn

Knitting Guerrillas Rock the Yarn

Knitting Guerrillas Rock the Yarn

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A Cast Off knitting party in London. Courtesy of Rachael Matthews hide caption

Xtreme Knitters Rock the Yarn
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Courtesy of Rachael Matthews

Extreme knitters cover rooms and create graffiti, in updated take on a traditional craft.

Sabrina Gschwandtner, editor the zine KnitKnit and a new book KnitKnit: Profiles and Projects from Knitting's New Wave, says she went looking for people who saw the possibilities in handcrafts.

Extreme knitters work weird stuff like fiberglass and lead, get together for massive knitting parties and cover entire park benches with yarn.

Gschwandtner found one group of hobbyists, the Knittas, is a multigenerational group of knitting guerrillas based in Houston, Texas. They drape their knitted "tags" in urban locations, much the way a graffiti artist would tag a wall. "They've tagged New York," she says. "They've tagged the Great Wall of China."

On our blog, a guy who drums and knits — at the same time.