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Isuzu to Abandon SUV Market in U.S.

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Isuzu to Abandon SUV Market in U.S.

Business

Isuzu to Abandon SUV Market in U.S.

Isuzu to Abandon SUV Market in U.S.

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Isuzu Motors says it will stop selling sport-utility vehicles and light passenger trucks in the United States, though it will continue producing commercial trucks. Isuzu helped popularize SUVs in the 1980s, with models like the Trooper and the Rodeo.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with an SUV maker peeling out of the U.S. market.

Isuzu Motors says it will stop selling sport utility vehicles and passenger trucks in the U.S., though it will continue producing commercial trucks. Isuzu helped popularized SUVs in the 1980s with models like the Trooper and the Rodeo.

As other carmakers sped into the SUV market, Isuzu lost its position at the forefront. Last year the company sold just 7,000 vehicles in the U.S. Isuzu says its move to exit the American passenger market starting next year is the result of General Motors' decision to stop producing the two models it makes for Isuzu.

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