NPR logo

Adrian Tomine, Drawing Delicately from Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18571923/18571917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Adrian Tomine, Drawing Delicately from Life

Interviews

Adrian Tomine, Drawing Delicately from Life

Adrian Tomine, Drawing Delicately from Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18571923/18571917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The two faces of Tomine: Real-life issues get the graphic treatment in Shortcomings, the new novel by Adrian Tomine. Peter Stanglmayr (photo), Adrian Tomine (self-portrait illustration) hide caption

toggle caption Peter Stanglmayr (photo), Adrian Tomine (self-portrait illustration)

Movie-theater owner Ben Tanaka is having relationship issues; his girlfriend, Miko, suspects he's secretly attracted to white women. (She's right, but he won't admit it.)

In Shortcomings, Asian-American graphic novelist Adrian Tomine (Scrapbook, Summer Blonde) has finally done what many fans and critics have suggested he should: addressed race in his work.

Tomine is celebrated for the grace and sophistication of his work; novelist Jonathan Lethem says that "his mastery of literary time suggests Alice Munro," and Junot Diaz says Tomine's "dramatic instincts are second-to-none."

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.