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McCain, Obama Share Celebration Space
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McCain, Obama Share Celebration Space

Election 2008

McCain, Obama Share Celebration Space

McCain, Obama Share Celebration Space
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GOP voters in Oklahoma, Okla., celebrated John McCain's Super Tuesday victory in the same brewery where supporters of Democratic contender Barack Obama gathered for their party.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Let's go to a couple of the states that voted yesterday. We mentioned that Mike Huckabee won states with a lot of evangelical voters. That was not true in the state we're going next.

From Oklahoma City, NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports.

WADE GOODWYN: Oklahoma is a state that gravitates toward evangelical candidates. With Arkansas right next door, Oklahoma seem like a very good bet for the former Baptist preacher Mike Huckabee. And Huckabee did do well, just not well enough, losing to John McCain 37 to 33 percent. How did McCain do it? By being a war hero who is gung-ho on Iraq. Oklahoma is filled with military bases. They are the state's largest employer. For many of these voters, McCain was a standup guy - someone they could trust.

(Soundbite of cheers)

GOODWYN: Strangely, the celebrations for both the Republican Party and Barack Obama were on the second floor of the Bricktown Brewery in Oklahoma City. The one elevator happened to open onto the entryway to the Republican celebration. When the elevator door opened to reveal Obama supporters inside, you could see the surprise, then puzzlement had all of the suit and tie and cocktail dress people milling around in front of them. Could these voters have come over to Obama? No. The Obama supporters would be kindly directed to the other side of the room. Most of the time, the staffers didn't have to ask which party a group wanted. They could tell by looking.

Wade Goodwyn, NPR News, Oklahoma City.

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